Knowledge

A Step-by-Step Guide to Getting Your GED

og:image Your GED Guide

Sometimes life throws you a curveball, and for about 10% of Michigan adults, that curveball results in not completing their degree in a traditional high school setting. Although the thought of re-entering a classroom setting might be scary, earning your GED credential is a big deal for you and your future.

1. DECIDE IF THE GED IS RIGHT FOR YOU

The GED, or General Education Development credential, is a series of tests that determine your proficiency in four core high school subjects. If you’re 16 years of age or older and have been out of school for at least one calendar year, you’re probably a good candidate for the GED.

While the GED might not always be a listed requirement, it will increase the number and quality of jobs you have access to in the future. Even if you’re currently employed, you may risk getting passed up for or a promotion or being hired into a permanent job without it. And if you’re looking to continue your education, the GED is critical for being accepted into a higher education program.

2. DETERMINE YOUR TESTING LOCATION AND FEES

The GED must be taken in person at an official testing center. You can browse testing locations to find the closest center to you. The State of Michigan now offers this service on the computer, so you’ll be able to know your score before you even leave the testing center.

You’re probably wondering, “how much this is going to cost?” In the state of Michigan, each test costs $37.50, totaling $150. If you’re planning to continue your education beyond the GED, you may also be eligible for the GED-to-School Program, which covers the cost of one attempt of the four different test content areas.

3. STUDY UP AND ACE THE TEST

The GED tests you on four key subjects: Language Arts, Social Studies, Science, and Mathematics. While you’re not required to take any practice tests prior to taking the official GED test, it’s always a good idea to brush up on your skills to give yourself the best chance at success.

A great, free resource for studying is always your local public library. There are also several online classes you can take to get prepared – online study guides like these are a quick way to identify where your strengths and weaknesses are across each subject so you can work toward improving your score.

With a little hard work and determination, you’ll be acing the test and enjoying a sense of accomplishment in no time.

For more success tips like this, contact us or apply now to speak with a recruiter. We’d love to meet you.

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